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Senior year: finalizing the details

Don’t overlook these key details as your final year of high school begins.

Senior year can go by in the blink of an eye. Now is a great time to stay organized, review remaining tasks, and tie up any loose ends.

Financial aid and scholarship applications

Be sure your family stays on top of any financial aid and scholarship applications. First, fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to figure out your expected family contribution — it’s available to complete on October 1 each year. Determine early on which type of aid you’ll be applying for: federal student loans, private student loans, grants, or work-study. The sooner you get the applications complete, the better to help ensure that everything is in place for a smooth transition to college in the fall.

Letters of recommendation

Well before the application deadlines, ask your teachers and counselors for letters of recommendation, making sure you give them letter-of-recommendation forms. Include stamped and addressed envelopes so there isn’t any confusion about where they should send the completed letters. Discuss post-high-school goals with each teacher so they’ll be more prepared to write a well-thought-out letter.

Standardized testing

If you haven’t done so already, register for and take any standardized tests required for college. Make sure you check with the schools you’re interested in to see what tests they require. As a note: If you’re a senior, typically the January SAT is the last one colleges will be able to consider.

If you’ve received official scores from taking the ACT, SAT, or AP test, make sure they’re included in your admissions packages, whether they’re mailed or digital. Currently, you can send four free SAT and ACT score reports to schools for up to nine days after the test.

Think you’ll need to send more than four SAT score reports? Your school counselor or an authorized community-based organization may be able to help you get a fee waiver to avoid extra costs. Unfortunately, the ACT doesn’t currently offer any fee waivers for more than four reports.

College admission checklist

Make sure you turn in everything the school has requested, including any deposits, transcripts, etc., by the deadline — usually May 1. If final transcripts are required, set a reminder to get those before the last day of school — school administrators may be harder to contact after graduation day.

And don’t forget about orientation. Register for orientation as soon as possible to secure a date that works for your family.

Beware of senioritis

Although college planning and preparation are important, try your best to stay motivated and finish your last year strong — avoid senioritis! Once an acceptance letter comes in, it’s tempting for students to coast to the end of senior year and disregard their performance in the classroom. But many colleges do check on final transcripts, so final grades are important to success in college.

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Caroline Hanson
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Caroline Hanson

Communications Consultant at Wells Fargo
Copywriter at Wells Fargo.

She’s experienced in planning and paying for college both as a student and parent. With one child through college and two more a few years away from it, she is right there with you on the college-planning journey. A creative pro with years logged in journalism, public relations, and marketing, she’s been writing for the College Planning Blog since its launch in 2006.
Caroline Hanson
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