Infographic: How should you spend your time preparing for the SAT?

Whether you have weeks, hours, or just a few minutes, here are some ways to study up.

It’s no surprise that the SAT is still the go-to evaluation for college admissions, and the competition can sometimes seem steep. In fact, 2.1 million students from the class of 2018 took the new SAT, a 25% increase over last year. How can you set yourself apart from the competition? A lot of it comes down to your SAT study prep.

Here’s how to tackle SAT study prep depending on how much time you have available.

SAT studying infographic

Infographic text:

If you have a few weeks:

  • Sign up for an SAT prep class and/or get a private tutor.
    Classes and tutors can provide you with a structured method of studying and can help you stick to a study plan.
  • Complete a full SAT practice test.
    Set a goal to complete at least two full practice tests — and time them — so you can best simulate test day.

If you have a few hours:

  • Watch some SAT test prep videos.
    Available online, you can learn effective strategies for each section of the exam, which can help you as you take practice tests.
  • Read some nonfiction in your spare time.
    The SAT contains dense passages of text, which can be a struggle for an unpracticed reader. Read some long articles, scientific studies, or other passages now to train your brain so it’s not exhausted come test day.

If you have a few minutes:

  • Practice mental math.
    You’ll need to sharpen your math skills — without the aid of a calculator — for the SAT. Grab some math problems from a study booklet or download a mental math practice app on your phone for on-the-go studying.
  • Review vocabulary flashcards.
    You can buy them, make your own, or download an app. Improve your vocab skills and expand your vernacular.
0
Dana Fulton
Follow me

Dana Fulton

Social Media Content Manager at Wells Fargo
Creative professional with years of sales and marketing experience, specializing in segment-specific strategy and customer-centric communications. Skills include problem solving, collaboration, critical thinking, and clarifying the complex.
Dana Fulton
Follow me
Share this article:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *